Assessing global patterns in mammalian carnivore occupancy and richness by integrating local camera trap surveys

Authors
Rich, Lindsey N.; Davis, Courtney L.; Farris, Zach J.; Miller, David A. W.; Tucker, Jody M.; Hamel, Sandra; Farhadinia, Mohammad S.; Steenweg, Robin; Di Bitetti, Mario Santiago; Thapa, Kanchan; Kane, Mamadou D.; Sunarto, S.; Robinson, Nathaniel P.; Paviolo, Agustin Javier; Cruz, María Paula; Martins, Quinton; Gholikhani, Navid; Taktehrani, Ateih; Whittington, Jesse; Widodo, Febri A.; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Wultsch, Claudia; Harmsen, Bart J.; Kelly, Marcella J.
Publication Year
2017
Language
English
Format
article
Status
Published version
Description
Aim:Biodiversity loss is a major driver of ecosystem change, yet the ecological data required to detect and mitigate losses are often lacking. Recently, camera trap surveys have been suggested as a method for sampling local wildlife communities, because these observations can be collated into a global monitoring network. To demonstrate the potential of camera traps for globalmonitoring, we assembled data from multiple local camera trap surveys to evaluate the interchange between fine- and broad-scale processes impacting mammalian carnivore communities.Location: Argentina, Belize, Botswana, Canada, Indonesia, Iran, Madagascar, Nepal, Norway, Senegal, South Africa, and the U.S.A.Methods:We gathered camera trap data, totalling>100,000 trap nights, from across five continents. To analyse local and species-specific responses to anthropogenic and environmental variables, we fitted multispecies occurrence models to each study area. To analyse global-level responses, we then fitted a multispecies, multi-area occurrence model.Results:We recorded 4,805 detections of 96 mammalian carnivore species photographed across 1,714 camera stations located in 12 countries. At the global level, our models revealed that carnivore richness and occupancy within study areas was positively associated with prey availability.Occupancy within study areas also tended to increase with greater protection and greater distances to roads. The strength of these relationships, however, differed among countries.Main conclusions:We developed a research framework for leveraging global camera trap data to evaluate patterns of mammalian carnivore occurrence and richness across multiple spatial scales.Our research highlights the importance of intact prey populations and protected areas in conserving carnivore communities. Our research also highlights the potential of camera traps for monitoring wildlife communities and provides a case study for how this can be achieved on a global scale. We encourage greater integration and standardization among camera trap studies worldwide, which would help inform effective conservation planning for wildlife populations bothlocally and globally.
Fil: Rich, Lindsey N.. Virginia Tech University; Estados Unidos
Fil: Davis, Courtney L.. University of Pennsylvania; Estados Unidos
Fil: Farris, Zach J.. Virginia Tech University; Estados Unidos
Fil: Miller, David A. W.. University of Pennsylvania; Estados Unidos
Fil: Tucker, Jody M.. U. S. Forest Service; Estados Unidos
Fil: Hamel, Sandra. The Arctic University of NorwayTromsø; Noruega
Fil: Farhadinia, Mohammad S.. Iranian Cheetah Society; Irán. University of Oxford; Reino Unido
Fil: Steenweg, Robin. State University of Montana; Estados Unidos
Fil: Di Bitetti, Mario Santiago. Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Facultad de Ciencias Forestales. Instituto de Biologia Subtropical - Sede Puerto Iguazu; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Nordeste. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú | Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú; Argentina
Fil: Thapa, Kanchan. Virginia Tech University; Estados Unidos
Fil: Kane, Mamadou D.. Senegalese National Parks; Senegal
Fil: Sunarto, S.. World Wildlife Fund; Indonesia
Fil: Robinson, Nathaniel P.. University of Montana; Estados Unidos
Fil: Paviolo, Agustin Javier. Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Facultad de Ciencias Forestales. Instituto de Biologia Subtropical - Sede Puerto Iguazu; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Nordeste. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú | Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú; Argentina
Fil: Cruz, María Paula. Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Facultad de Ciencias Forestales. Instituto de Biologia Subtropical - Sede Puerto Iguazu; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Nordeste. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú | Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Instituto de Biología Subtropical. Instituto de Biología Subtropical - Nodo Puerto Iguazú; Argentina
Fil: Martins, Quinton. The Cape Leopard Trust; Sudáfrica
Fil: Gholikhani, Navid. Iranian Cheetah Society; Irán
Fil: Taktehrani, Ateih. Iranian Cheetah Society; Irán
Fil: Whittington, Jesse. Banff National Parks; Canadá
Fil: Widodo, Febri A.. World Wildlife Fund; Indonesia
Fil: Yoccoz, Nigel G.. The Arctic University of NorwayTromsø; Noruega
Fil: Wultsch, Claudia. Virginia Tech University; Estados Unidos
Fil: Harmsen, Bart J.. University of Belize; Belice
Fil: Kelly, Marcella J.. Virginia Tech University; Estados Unidos
Subject
BIG DATA ANALYSIS
CAMERA TRAPS
CARNIVORE
GLOBAL
HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODELS
MULTI-SPECIES MODELING
SPECIES RICHNESS
SPECIES OCCURRENCE
Otras Ciencias Biológicas
Ciencias Biológicas
CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
Access level
Restricted access
License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
Repository
CONICET Digital (CONICET)
Institution
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas
OAI Identifier
oai:ri.conicet.gov.ar:11336/47825