Global Invader Impact Network (GIIN): toward standardized evaluation of the ecological impacts of invasive plants

Authors
Barney, Jacob N.; Tekiela, Daniel R.; Barrios Garcia Moar, Maria Noelia; Dimarco, Romina Daniela; Hufbauer, Ruth A.; Leipzig-Scott, Peter; Nuñez, Martin A.; Pauchard, Anibal; Pysek, Petr; Viıtkov, Michaela; Maxwell, Bruce D.
Publication Year
2015
Language
English
Format
article
Status
Published version
Description
Terrestrial invasive plants are a global problem and are becoming ubiquitous components of most ecosystems. They are implicated in altering disturbance regimes, reducing biodiversity, and changing ecosystem function, sometimes in profound and irreversible ways. However, the ecological impacts of most invasive plants have not been studied experimentally, and most research to date focuses on few types of impacts, which can vary greatly among studies. Thus, our knowledge of existing ecological impacts ascribed to invasive plants is surprisingly limited in both breadth and depth. Our aim was to propose a standard methodology for quantifying baseline ecological impact that, in theory, is scalable to any terrestrial plant invader (e.g., annual grasses to trees) and any invaded system (e.g., grassland to forest). The Global Invader Impact Network (GIIN) is a coordinated distributed experiment composed of an observational and manipulative methodology. The protocol consists of a series of plots located in (1) an invaded area; (2) an adjacent removal treatment within the invaded area; and (3) a spatially separate uninvaded area thought to be similar to pre-invasion conditions of the invaded area. A standardized and inexpensive suite of community, soil, and ecosystem metrics are collected allowing broad comparisons among measurements, populations, and species. The method allows for one-time comparisons and for long-term monitoring enabling one to derive information about change due to invasion over time. Invader removal plots will also allow for quantification of legacy effects and their return rates, which will be monitored for several years. GIIN uses a nested hierarchical scale approach encompassing multiple sites, regions, and continents. Currently, GIIN has network members in six countries, with new members encouraged. To date, study species include representatives of annual and perennial grasses; annual and perennial forbs; shrubs; and trees. The goal of the GIIN framework is to create a standard yet flexible platform for understanding the ecological impacts of invasive plants, allowing both individual and synthetic analyses across a range of taxa and ecosystems. If broadly adopted, this standard approach will offer unique insight into the ecological impacts of invasive plants at local, regional, and global scales.
Fil: Barney, Jacob N. Virginia Tech. Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science; Estados Unidos
Fil: Tekiela, Daniel R. Virginia Tech. Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science; Estados Unidos
Fil: Barrios Garcia Moar, Maria Noelia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. CENAC-APN; Argentina
Fil: Dimarco, Romina Daniela. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-INTA. Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Bariloche. Grupo de Ecología de Poblaciones de Insectos; Argentina
Fil: Hufbauer, Ruth A. Colorado State University. Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management and Graduate Degree Program in Ecology; Estados Unidos
Fil: Leipzig-Scott, Peter. Colorado State University. Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management and Graduate Degree Program in Ecology; Estados Unidos
Fil: Nuñez, Martin A. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad del Comahue. INIBIOMA. Laboratorio de Ecotono; Argentina
Fil: Pauchard, Anibal. Universidad de Concepción. Facultad de Ciencias Forestales. Laboratorio de Invasiones Biolóogicas; Chile. Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB); Chile
Fil: Pysek, Petr. The Czech Academy of Sciences. Institute of Botany. Department of Invasion Ecology; República Checa. Charles University in Prague. Faculty of Science. Department of Ecology; República Checa
Fil: Viıtkov, Michaela. The Czech Academy of Sciences. Institute of Botany. Department of Invasion Ecology; República Checa
Fil: Maxwell, Bruce D. Montana State University. Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences; Estados Unidos
Source
Ecology and Evolution 5 (14) : 2878–2889 (July 2015)
Subject
Malezas
Especie Invasiva
Redes de Investigación
Weeds
Invasive Species
Research Networks
Ecological Factors
Factor Ecológico
Access level
Open access
License
Repository
INTA Digital (INTA)
Institution
Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria
OAI Identifier
oai:localhost:20.500.12123/1752