Drivers of plant invasion vary globally: Evidence from pine invasions within six ecoregions

Authors
Taylor, Kimberley T.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Pauchard, Aníbal; Nuñez, Martin Andres; Peltzer, Duane A.; Terwei, André; Rew, Lisa J.
Publication Year
2016
Language
English
Format
article
Status
Published version
Description
Aim: To determine biotic and abiotic controls on pine invasion globally within six ecoregions that include both introduced and native ranges. Locations: Río Negro province, Argentina; Aysén and Araucanía regions, Chile; South Island (two ecoregions), New Zealand; Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, USA. Methods: We quantified tree abundance and size across invasion fronts of the widespread invasive tree species Pinus contorta at each of the nine sites, encompassing both the native and introduced range. We also determined the relative importance of propagule pressure, abiotic characteristics and biotic factors for invasion success. Finally, key plant population metrics such as individual tree growth rates and reproductive effort were compared between native and introduced ranges. Results: Pinus contorta density decreased with increasing distance from source population in all cases, but the importance and shape of this relationship differed among sites due, primarily to biotic factors. For example, areas dominated by native southern beech forest (Fuscospora cliffortioides or Nothofagus spp.) were not invaded, and this biotic resistance was not overcome by high propagule pressure. In contrast, shrublands were more highly invaded than grasslands, contradicting previous generalizations about pine invasions. Pinus contorta growth was faster, age to maturity was earlier and reproductive effort was higher in the introduced ranges compared with the native range, suggesting a demographic shift towards more rapid population growth in introduced regions. Climatic differences between the ranges may explain, at least in part, the observed pattern. Main conclusions: We demonstrate that although biological invasions are driven by propagule pressure across different ecoregions, these processes interact strongly with biotic factors. Intriguingly, our results suggest that propagule pressure may become less important than biotic interactions as invasions proceed. Multi-region studies including both the native and introduced ranges provide unparalleled opportunities for understanding how these interactions change among regions as invasions proceed.
Fil: Taylor, Kimberley T.. State University of Montana; Estados Unidos
Fil: Maxwell, Bruce D.. State University of Montana; Estados Unidos
Fil: Pauchard, Aníbal. Universidad de Concepción; Chile
Fil: Nuñez, Martin Andres. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Patagonia Norte. Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente. Universidad Nacional del Comahue. Centro Regional Universidad Bariloche. Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente; Argentina. Universidad Nacional del Comahue. Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche; Argentina
Fil: Peltzer, Duane A.. Crown Research Institutes. Landcare Research; Nueva Zelanda
Fil: Terwei, André. Universidad de Concepción; Chile. Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity; Chile
Fil: Rew, Lisa J.. State University of Montana; Estados Unidos
Subject
BIOGEOGRAPHY
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS
BIOTIC RESISTANCE
NEW ZEALAND
NON-NATIVE TREE INVASION
PATAGONIA
PINUS CONTORTA
PROPAGULE PRESSURE
TREE POPULATION DYNAMICS
Otras Ciencias Biológicas
Ciencias Biológicas
CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
Access level
Restricted access
License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
Repository
CONICET Digital (CONICET)
Institution
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas
OAI Identifier
oai:ri.conicet.gov.ar:11336/60803