Response of native and non-native ruderals to natural and human disturbance

Authors
Chiuffo, Mariana Cecilia; Cock, Marina Cecilia; Prina, Anibal Oscar; Hierro, Jose Luis
Publication Year
2018
Language
English
Format
article
Status
Published version
Description
The ruderal strategy is widely shared among non-native plants, providing a general explanation for the commonly observed positive effects of disturbance on invasions. How native ruderals respond to disturbance and how their abundance compares to that of non-native ruderals remains, however, poorly understood. Similarly, little is known about the role that disturbance type plays in the coexistence between native and non-native ruderals. We proposed that natural disturbance favors native over non-native ruderals, whereas novel anthropogenic disturbance favors non-natives over natives. To assess our general hypothesis, we conducted extensive field samplings in which we measured relative abundance, richness, and diversity of native and non-native ruderals in sites with natural and anthropogenic disturbance in central Argentina, a system where the ruderal strategy is common to a large number of native and non-native species. We found that natives dominated ruderal communities growing in recently burned grasslands, whereas non-natives dominated in roadsides. Additionally, the richness and diversity of native ruderal species were much greater than those of non-natives in sites with fire and in sites with grazing, but species richness and diversity did not differ between groups in roadsides. Because vegetation evolved with fire in our system and, in contrast, the construction and maintenance of roads is recent in it, these results support our hypothesis. Our work indicates that the ruderal strategy does not seem to suffice to explain why disturbance facilitates invasions. According to our data, species origin interacts with disturbance type to determine dominance in communities with coexisting native and non-native ruderals.
Fil: Chiuffo, Mariana Cecilia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Houssay. Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas; Argentina
Fil: Cock, Marina Cecilia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa; Argentina
Fil: Prina, Anibal Oscar. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Agronomía; Argentina
Fil: Hierro, Jose Luis. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales de La Pampa; Argentina. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina
Subject
CALDENAL
CENTRAL ARGENTINA
COEXISTENCE
DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS
PLANT ABUNDANCE
PLANT STRATEGY
Ecología
Ciencias Biológicas
CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
Access level
Restricted access
License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
Repository
CONICET Digital (CONICET)
Institution
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas
OAI Identifier
oai:ri.conicet.gov.ar:11336/81504